NATA Congressional Action Center

 
URGENT - Contact Your Member of Congress: Proposed User Fee-Funded Air Traffic Control Corporation Will Harm Aviation Businesses

On February 11th, 2016 the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee approved H.R. 4441, the Aviation Innovation, Reform, and Reauthorization (AIRR) Act. While the legislation includes many good provisions, its central tenet, the creation of a user fee-funded, not-for-profit air traffic control corporation, remains intact. The proposal will now be considered by the full House of Representatives, so it is critical you contact your Representatives and Senators today and voice your opposition. 

The House Transportation Committee proposal exempts from user fees some but not all segments of general aviation. For example, air charter and other commercial GA activity will be expected to pay yet to be determined user fees. Adding to, or supplanting current aviation taxes with user fees determined by an airline dominated corporation poses a serious threat to America's vibrant general aviation community. 

The general aviation community has grave concerns about creating an air traffic control corporation that go well beyond user fees. An ATC corporation, controlled in perpetuity by its airline dominated board of industry insiders, will place general aviation in constant peril from efforts by most major airlines to cost shift and deny general aviation access to airspace and airports. The proposal will undermine the national air transportation system by denying rural America access to cutting-edge technology, and it will saddle the traveling public with ever increasing fees.

We cannot allow aviation businesses to be held hostage to a coalition of airlines whose cost shifting agenda will destroy America’s vibrant general aviation community.

Using the easy steps below, contact your elected representatives and relay your concerns. Tell them how a user fee-funded air traffic control corporation undermines the jobs and investment created by your business.

Contact Your Respective Members of Congress:
Step 1 - Click here to find your Representative
Click here to find your Representative by zip code
Click here to find your Senator

Step 2 - Select the contact form for your Representative and Senators

Step 3 - Use the message below as a sample or enter your own message in the contact form

Step 4 - Let NATA know which Members you’ve contacted by emailing Rebecca Mulholland at NATA

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Contact Your Member of Congress:
Proposed User Fee-Funded Air Traffic Control Corporation Will Harm Aviation Businesses


Draft Message to House Members

Subject: Proposed User Fee-Funded Air Traffic Control Corporation Will Harm Aviation Businesses

The Honorable <NAME>
U.S. House of Representatives
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Representative <NAME>:

As a member of the general aviation business community employing XX people in your district, I write to express my strong opposition to a proposal (H.R. 4441)recently approved by the House Transportation Committee to create a user fee-funded air traffic control corporation. Such a corporation, controlled in perpetuity by an airline dominated board of directors, will place my business and its employees in constant peril from efforts by most major airlines to cost shift and deny general aviation access to airspace and airports. 

The proposal will undermine the national air transportation system by denying rural America access to cutting-edge technology and it will saddle the rest of your constituents with ever increasing travel fees.  While I agree that maintaining the status quo risks our nation’s supremacy in aviation, I believe the radical changes the bill proposes to the FAA’s management structure and funding poses equal risks to the safe and stable nature of the world’s best air traffic control system and America’s vibrant general aviation community.

I appreciate the work the House Transportation Committee and its members have done to improve operations at the FAA. While the legislation contains many helpful provisions that will make it easier for aviation businesses to interact with the FAA, separating air traffic control from the agency’s regulatory functions undermines aviation safety, jobs and investment.

Thank you for your consideration. Please do not hesitate to reach out to me with questions at (XXX) XXX-XXXX.

Sincerely,
<Name>
<Company>
<Address>

Draft Message to Senators

Subject: Proposed User Fee-Funded Air Traffic Control Corporation Will Harm Aviation Businesses

The Honorable <NAME>
U.S. Senate
Washington, DC 20510

Dear Senator <NAME>:

As a member of the general aviation business community employing XX people in your state, I write to express my strong opposition to a proposal recently approved by the House Transportation Committee  to create a user fee-funded air traffic control corporation. Such a corporation, controlled in perpetuity by its airline dominated board of directors, will place my business and its employees in constant peril from efforts by most major airlines to cost shift and deny general aviation access to airspace and airports. The proposal will undermine the national air transportation system by denying rural America access to cutting-edge technology and it will saddle the rest of your constituents with ever increasing travel fees.

While I agree that maintaining the status quo risks our nation’s supremacy in aviation, I believe that radical changes to the FAA’s management structure and funding poses equal risks to the safe and stable nature of the world’s best air traffic control system and America’s vibrant general aviation community.

The upcoming FAA reauthorization presents many opportunities to improve operations at the FAA and make it easier for aviation businesses to interact with the FAA. However, separating air traffic control from the agency’s regulatory functions undermines aviation safety, jobs and investment.

Thank you for your consideration. Please do not hesitate to reach out to me with questions at (XXX) XXX-XXXX.

Sincerely,
<Name>
<Company>
<Address>